Grooming Artist News Roundup: March 2017

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This month marks the official start of spring. If you’re planning on spring cleaning, don’t forget to spring clean your grooming habits as well. In the past, we’ve stressed the importance of taking care of your skin so it stays supple yet resilient against the trauma of shaving. Sharpologist teaches how exfoliating your skin builds upon the razors, shaving creams, and aftershaves you use. By removing dead skin cells and debris, exfoliators allow creams and lotions to penetrate better.

Then there’s the rest of your body. You probably have an exquisite method of cleaning up your beard, but what about the hair elsewhere? A matter of presentation as much as pride, manscaping keeps your body in good form, so we’ve included grooming tips from Ask Men.

Beyond shaving, we offer wardrobe inspiration in the form of a history lesson on 1940s style. From bombers to wide-legged slacks, many of the pieces we wear today have their origin in this time period.

Finally, we’ve included ideas for life-changing solo trips, and a type of story we love reading here at RoyalShave: a writer at The Atlantic discovers DE razors and never goes back.

Enjoy!

If you’re not exfoliating, you’re not getting the most out of your shave. Sharpologist recommends five excellent exfoliators. (Sharpologist)

Vacation weather has arrived. Make the most of it – while challenging your boundaries – by jetting off on one of these eight solo trips. (MR PORTER)

Excellent tips for wet shaving while traveling. (Grooming Artist)

Ask Men‘s comprehensive guide to manscaping. (Ask Men)

One man’s journey from what he thought was a permanent rash of razor bumps to irritation-free skin, thanks to switching over to safety razors. (The Atlantic)

A lesson in style: we look at the influence of 1940s Wartime fashion on today’s trends. (Grooming Artist)

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The Influence of 1940’s Fashion on Today’s Fashion

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Personal style is a big part of being a well-groomed gentleman. A freshly-shaven face and smart outfit go hand in hand in making a stylish first impression. And fashion always takes cues from the past.

That’s why we’re excited to hand it over to Marie Miguel, a fashion journalist, to give us a fun history lesson about men’s and women’s’ fashion in the 1940s, and how that era still has influence over what we wear today.

Enjoy!

Fashion in the 1940s focused more on comfort than aesthetics. The start of the World War II significantly increased the popularity of utilitarian style. Practical styles were hugely advocated since it was an era of strict rationing and patriotism. With less extravagant pieces of jewelry, embroideries, and heavy fabrics, men and women were able to do their day jobs with ease.

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Katherine Hepburn in wide-legged slacks.

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Typical 1940s day dresses were uniform in nature.

What women wore during wartime 1940s

Unlike women’s fashion in the previous decades, clothing in the 1940s was uniform in nature. Dresses, blouses, and skirts had standard lengths, shapes, and patterns. Squared shoulders, below-the-knee skirts, and narrow hip suits became very popular.

As the female workface increased, women began wearing wide-legged slacks because pants were much easier to work in than a dress or skirt. While initially only worn while working, these slacks transitioned into everyday wear and even became integrated into pants suits. At the height of the war, women were also encouraged to create their own dresses to conserve materials and reduce their clothing expenses.

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What men wore during wartime 1940s

The movie The Aviator starring Leonardo Di Caprio accurately depicts the state of men’s fashion during World War II.

Men wore plain suits in muted colors like black, navy, and tan. Vests, trouser cuffs, and pocket flaps declined in popularity as the need for sturdy clothing such as trousers and shirts made with cotton twill or gabardine started to rise. Additionally, the government mandated specific rules for tailoring: no double-breasted jackets, no slits or buttons on the cuff, and three pockets or less.

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Christian Dior’s “New Look”, circa 1947.

Fashion after the war

When the war ended in the late 1940s, rationing was lifted and men and women gained access to expensive clothing and accessories. Designers could choose from an array of laces, fancy fabrics, and textiles. Hence, the fashion industry regained its glamour and boomed once again. A prime example of post-WWII glamour is Christian Dior’s “New Look” – a long, full circle skirt nipped in the waist, featuring tons of fabric.

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WWII fashion vs. today

Women

Today, women still wear clothes with squared shoulders (without the pads), sports jackets, and knee-length skirts, styles which were quite popular in the 1940s. Utilitarian dresses and skirts are worn to achieve a vintage look. Moreover, the modified version of the wide leg slacks introduced in the same era has become quite popular among celebrities. Often, the slacks are paired with cotton or silk blouses and worn at formal events.

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Men

Suits are still considered de rigueur for formal events and business meetings. But suits have also carried over into street style in recent years. It’s not uncommon to see men wearing blazers and slacks in the streets to achieve a high fashion look. Sans the tie and bow, suits are worn casually and paired with sporty polo shirts and plain t-shirts.

Also important to note: many of the trendy styles both men and women wear today – bomber jackets, trench coats, chinos, and aviator glasses – have their origin in WWII military clothing.

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