How to Produce Superlather

superlather

Superlather is an oft-discussed topic in the wet shaving community. Some see it as a waste of time, while others can’t sing enough praises about its lovely whipped consistency and easy customization. In the end, all of us desire lather that provides us with enough cushion, glide, and slickness for minimal irritation, cuts, and nicks. Superlather is one route to consider.

Today, we look at why you should consider adding superlather to your shaving routine.

What is superlather?

Superlather is the technique of combining shaving soap and shaving cream to produce lather. In doing so, you combine the smoothing qualities of shaving soap with the easy-to-lather, slick cushion of shaving cream. The result is a dense, creamy lather similar in consistency to whipped cream that is more beneficial than using soap or cream alone.

What is the point of creating superlather?

There are a few good reasons to give superlather a go:

  1. You own a wonderfully scented soap but its lather leaves much to be desired.

Let’s say you’re taken with Geo. F. Trumper Hard Shaving Soap in Almond, but it won’t give you a lick of lather. Combine that soap with an unscented shaving cream like Truefitt & Hill Ultimate Comfort Shaving Cream and you will have salvaged a soap that might otherwise just sit and collect dust.

  1. You have a soap lacking in one performance area and want to combine it with a complementary product that makes up for this weakness.

For instance, your Acca Kappa LiboCedro Shaving Soap Bowl may offer fantastic glide and lather stability, but you’d like more cushion. Add a small drop of Taylor of Old Bond Street Luxury Shaving Cream Bowl in Sandalwood for a creamy cushion.

  1. You’d like to experiment with scent combinations.

Wet shaving is a pleasure and a hobby. As such, many of us own more soaps and shaving creams than we’d like to admit. One way to get around to using your entire collection is mixing and matching scent combinations. The experimentation process is an adventure, and you end up with a customized scent!

  1. You have hard water.

If you have hard water where you live, lathering with a soap can be near impossible. The high mineral content in hard water reacts with soap, producing insufficient lather. Superlather mitigates this with the addition of shaving cream, which already contains water and is therefore not dependent on water hardness for a good lather.

That being said, we still highly recommend investing in a water softener or purchasing distilled water for shaving purposes. You simply will not get your best shave using hard water. Learn more about how hard water affects shaving here.

Superlather process

To create superlather:

  1. While you’re showering, soak your brush in water.
  2. Place an almond-sized dollop of shaving cream in your shaving bowl.
  3. Load your brush for 30 seconds on the soap.
  4. Build your lather by working the soap and the cream together in the bowl. Swirl the brush using circular motions while monitoring the lather’s consistency. If it’s becoming pasty or dry, add a few drops of water.
  5. You’ll know you’re done when lather starts resembling whipped cream.

5 Wet Shaving Mistakes to Avoid

Using an old fasion safety razor man is shaving his face

Maybe you’re transitioning over from electric razors for the first time, or maybe you’re a veteran shaver who’s looking to fine tune your craft. No matter how experienced you are with wet shaving, there are things we can all learn from the following 5 common wet shaving mistakes. Thankfully, each one is easily remedied.

Read on for the list, and let us know if there’s one you’d like to add in the comments below!

Not listening to the sound

Are you paying attention to the sound your razor makes when it glides across your stubble? If you listen, you’ll be able to hear auditory feedback when your hair growth changes direction. This is especially important because when your face is covered with lather, it’s hard to see the different hair growth patterns underneath. Your razor will make different sounds depending on if you’re going with the grain, across the grain, or against the grain. Scraping sounds are bad; crisp cutting sounds are good.

Our advice is to shave in a quiet bathroom so you can only hear the sound of your shaving. Be sure to turn off running water.

Shaving on unlathered skin

So you’ve just made a not-so-good pass on your neck area. Your natural instinct is to quickly go over the same area again, even though the lather has been removed by your previous pass.

But that’s a one-way ticket to razor burn, nicks, and cuts. Resist the temptation and apply lather, or at least water, before going at the spot again. A little protection is better than no protection.

Not rinsing the razor and shaking water off between passes

Don’t just run your razor under water, or dip it in water, to remove lather between passes. If you don’t flick the water off afterwards, your razor will create a dripping mess once it hits your skin again.

Not creating good lather

Lather should not feel like a thick paste. If it does, it means your lather is too dry. Add a small amount of water to your lather to correct. If the lather is already on your face, dip your brush in water and run it over your face until you get a fluffier consistency.

Globbing lather onto your skin

Are you just globbing lather onto your face with no particular direction or motion?

Use your shaving brush as a tool to both build lather and paint the lather onto your skin. Lathering will always be a somewhat messy process, but to get it evenly onto your skin, apply lather by making circular motions with your brush. Brushing it on like this will also ensure the lather penetrates into your skin, so its hydrating qualities will keep your skin protected during the shave.

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