9 Easy Razor Burn Solutions

No matter how masterful a wet shaver you are, you’ve experienced razor burn at some point. As a shaving connoisseur, you already know that switching to a DE razor or straight razor eliminates most of the threat. But there are plenty of other solutions, too, that might not occur to you right away. Making moisturizing a daily routine, for instance, instead of only after you shave, or shaving at night so you’re not stressing your skin with a full day of activities and environmental toxins.

If you have a tip not mentioned on this list, share it with us – and your fellow wet shavers – by leaving a comment below, or connecting with us on Facebook or Instagram.

1. Exfoliate before you shave

If you’re not exfoliating, you’re missing a crucial step to preventing razor burn. Exfoliating removes dead skin, oil, and other debris that can clog your razor blade and lead to razor burn. Exfoliating can also unearth ingrown hairs.

Choose an exfoliator based on your skin type: if you have normal/oily skin, try an exfoliator with glycolic acid, which dissolves the outermost layer of skin to encourage cell repair and healing. Pick one that comes with physical exfoliators (like beads or pumice) to get a deeper clean. Billy Jealousy Assassin is an intense exfoliator with walnut shell powder and sweet almond meal for physical exfoliation, as well as natural exfoliating enzymes. It’s so effective you can reduce the appearance of discoloration and scars over time!

If you have sensitive skin, a chemical exfoliator with beta hydroxy acids is gentler. We’re a big fan of Triumph & Disaster Rock & Roll Suicide Face Scrub, which exfoliates with salicylic acid, volcanic ash, and green clay.

2. Make moisturizing a routine

Good skincare, plain and simple, is the basis of strong, healthy skin.

Dragging a piece of metal across your face is highly irritating. Keep your skin hydrated and irritation-free with a gentle aftershave balm, followed by a fragrance-free moisturizer. Avoid products containing alcohol, which is drying.

But don’t just limit moisturizing to after your shaves; apply moisturizer every morning and at night before you go to sleep.

3. Rinse your face with cold water after shaving

Warm water feels better, but at the end of a shave, splashing your face with cold water closes pores and cuts. It can even prevent ingrown hairs from forming.

4. Clean your blade between strokes

Each stroke you make collects a fresh batch of bacteria, shaving cream, and whiskers. If you don’t rinse your blade before the next stroke, you’re using a blade that’s filled with goop. Because the razor is now dull, you’ll get an uneven cut and may end up pressing down harder to compensate, irritating the skin. Not only that, but the dirty razor will also distribute pore-clogging bacteria. The solution? Simply rinse your blade with water between each stroke.

5. Disinfect the blade with alcohol

Over time, blades dull as mineral crystals from the water form microscopic “teeth” on the edge. These teeth drag across the skin, producing razor burn and cuts. Prevent this process by dipping the blade in rubbing alcohol at the end of your shave. Dip the blade in rubbing alcohol again right before you start your next shave.

6. Natural remedies

Aloe vera – Aloe vera is nature’s gift to irritated skin. It’s a painkiller that reduces swelling while forming a moisturizing barrier to encourage healing. Plus, it naturally contains salicylic acid to destroy bacteria.

Aloe vera cools on contact to sooth razor burn. Apply aloe vera gel on your face and allow to set for 5 – 10 minutes before rinsing off with cool water.

Tea bags – White, green, and black tea contain tannic acid, which is an anti-bacterial, astringent, and antioxidant. Once you’re finished with your morning tea, place the tea bag in the fridge for 10 minutes. Then rub the tea bag over the inflamed skin to calm redness.

Honey – Honey is an antibacterial that reduces swelling and inflammation while moisturizing the skin. Apply honey to skin and leave on for 10 – 15 minutes before rinsing.

Aspirin – Make use of aspirin’s excellent anti-inflammatory properties by creating an aspirin paste. Crush two aspirins in a teaspoon of water, then rub the paste on affected skin. Rinse off after 10 minutes.

7. Use an antibiotic face wash or ointment

Razor burn is caused by bacteria, so eliminate the source with either an antibacterial face wash or ointment.

8. Shave at night

Think about your morning routine. Let’s say you shave, apply aftershave, lotion, and sunscreen before heading out the door. Then you spend a full day out and about, during which time you’re likely to sweat. The sweat, in combination with using multiple products, can make your skin more prone to razor burn.

You are also more likely to come into contact with bacteria and toxins during the day.

Switch to shaving at night so you’re not stressing your skin out right after a shave. Instead, your skin will have a full night to focus on nothing but repair.

9. Remember your environment

If you live in a cold, dry climate, consider using a richer aftershave and moisturizer. If it’s hot and humid, you can get away with using a lighter product. Even if you live somewhere with moderate weather – like California – you may still want to switch up your products depending on the season.

Tips for Wet Shaving While Traveling, Part 3: Strops, Mugs, and Razor Cases

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Welcome to Part 3 of Tips for Wet Shaving While Traveling! Today we will be looking at the best solutions for strops, mugs, and general toiletries when you’re on the go. Just because space is limited in your suitcase doesn’t mean you have to halt your grooming ritual. Get a fantastic shave away from home with the tips below.

Remember to check out Part 1: Razors and Blades, and Part 2: Brushes, Shave Soaps, and Aftershaves.

Strops

Traveling with a straight razor and want to bring along a strop? How you pack it will depend on its size. Long, hanging strops belong in your checked bag (lie them flat to prevent creasing).

Paddle strops are sturdier and smaller, so they can fit safely in your carry-on. We have used the Bison Paddle Strop Razor Case to great success. Measuring only 9 inches in length, this two-in-one strop and razor case maximizes space.

Mugs

No matter how well you pack a mug, there’s always the possibility that it’ll break during your travels. Plus, mugs are rather bulky to fit into your dopp kit. Instead, borrow a handy contraption from the camping world: a collapsible mug.

The Sea to Summit X-Mug Collapsible Mug is made of durable silicone and features an accordion design that folds flat for easy storage. Lather the same way you do with your regular mug, then let it float in a sink of hot water to keep the lather warm.

Razor cases and dopp kits

If you’re an infrequent traveler, you can get away with simply rolling your razor in a towel for storage. But if you’re always jetting from place to place for business trips, invest in a razor case that’ll keep your razor secure for the long haul. The RoyalShave Nappa Leather Safety Razor Case by Dovo holds your razor with an internal elastic band, and even includes a blade storage compartment.

Frequent travelers will also benefit from a dedicated travel case or dopp kit. Made of supple vegetable-tanned leather, the Muhle Small Handmade Leather Travel Bag features a rigid body for safe storage of all your toiletries. Plus, the leather will develop a unique patina over time, reflective of your life and travels. A dopp kit is another valid option – make sure to purchase one that can withstand sharp razor blades and possible spills, like the Piccadilly Gladstone Leather Washbag.

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Tips for Wet Shaving While Traveling, Part 2: Brushes, Shave Soaps, and Aftershaves

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Welcome to Part 2 of Tips for Wet Shaving While Traveling!

Today we’ll be covering the supporting players of your wet shave routine: brushes, soaps/creams, and aftershaves. Whether you plan to bring the current product you use or will be purchasing a special travel-friendly version, we have solutions that’ll see you through your trip seamlessly.

Check back for Part 3 soon, and don’t forget to read up on Part 1: Razors & Blades here.

Travel brushes

You have two options here:

Buy a travel brush/compact brush –

Many wet shaving brands offer travel-sized brushes. These tend to be small brushes, and often come in travel tubes with caps, like the da Vinci UOMO Voyage 295 Silvertip Badger Travel Brush. This design protects your brush while allowing air flow to prevent the growth of mold. You can also try a compact brush, like the well-loved Omega #11047 Mighty Midget Boar/Badger Shave Brush. Standing at just 73 mm tall, this Omega brush features a fan-shaped bristle loft for easy lathering and a sturdy handle.

Pop your current brush into a prescription bottle –

Don’t want to give up your favorite brush while you travel? We don’t blame you. A simple solution is to put your full-size shaving brush in a tall prescription bottle. This will protect your bristles throughout the trip. If you don’t have one on hand, you can purchase them cheaply at a local drugstore or pharmacy. Don’t forget to drill a small hole into the lid to facilitate drying.

Shave soaps and creams

Shaving soap

Unfortunately, you’ll have to ditch your fancy wooden soap bowl, as the lid won’t close securely during flights. Plus, the bulky size of these screw-top bowls makes them hard to fit into a small carry-on. Thankfully, there’s an easy solution. Slip your puck into a Ziploc container. You can also venture into the world of shaving sticks, which create foolproof lather right on your face. No mug is necessary with a shaving stick (saving you a little room in your bag). Since shaving sticks are solid and come in tubes, you don’t have to worry about anything popping open or leaking.

Shaving cream

Plastic hinged-lid containers (like these from The Container Store) transport shaving cream well, and are available in multiple sizes depending on how much shaving cream you’d like to bring. Since the lids don’t fall off, you won’t have to worry about leaks. Some companies also make shaving cream tube versions of their shaving creams. You can find Taylor of Old Bond Street’s popular fragrances, including Eton College and St. James, in a shaving cream tube.

Aftershaves

When you travel, you’re going to be a lot more active than usual, which means you can easily get dehydrated. To keep yourself and your skin in good shape, remember to drink lots of water and to bring a rich aftershave balm. Truefitt & Hill has a luxurious travel-sized version of their Ultimate Comfort Aftershave Balm. If you want to kill two birds with one stone, the company’s Authentic No. 10 Post-Shave Cologne Balm works as both an aftershave balm for sensitive skin and lightweight woodsy cologne.

If you prefer not to buy a separate aftershave for travel, transfer some of your normal aftershave into a flip-top bottle. The Nalgene Flip-Top Leakproof Travel Bottle is compact and worry-free.

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Grooming Artist News Roundup: March 2017

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This month marks the official start of spring. If you’re planning on spring cleaning, don’t forget to spring clean your grooming habits as well. In the past, we’ve stressed the importance of taking care of your skin so it stays supple yet resilient against the trauma of shaving. Sharpologist teaches how exfoliating your skin builds upon the razors, shaving creams, and aftershaves you use. By removing dead skin cells and debris, exfoliators allow creams and lotions to penetrate better.

Then there’s the rest of your body. You probably have an exquisite method of cleaning up your beard, but what about the hair elsewhere? A matter of presentation as much as pride, manscaping keeps your body in good form, so we’ve included grooming tips from Ask Men.

Beyond shaving, we offer wardrobe inspiration in the form of a history lesson on 1940s style. From bombers to wide-legged slacks, many of the pieces we wear today have their origin in this time period.

Finally, we’ve included ideas for life-changing solo trips, and a type of story we love reading here at RoyalShave: a writer at The Atlantic discovers DE razors and never goes back.

Enjoy!

If you’re not exfoliating, you’re not getting the most out of your shave. Sharpologist recommends five excellent exfoliators. (Sharpologist)

Vacation weather has arrived. Make the most of it – while challenging your boundaries – by jetting off on one of these eight solo trips. (MR PORTER)

Excellent tips for wet shaving while traveling. (Grooming Artist)

Ask Men‘s comprehensive guide to manscaping. (Ask Men)

One man’s journey from what he thought was a permanent rash of razor bumps to irritation-free skin, thanks to switching over to safety razors. (The Atlantic)

A lesson in style: we look at the influence of 1940s Wartime fashion on today’s trends. (Grooming Artist)

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